Archive for the ‘Church Administration’ category

Between Hyper-Calvinism and Pragmatism

April 23, 2010

For the past couple of weeks, I have been working through the book of Nehemiah.  One of the books that has been helpful to me is J.I. Packer’s A Passion for Faithfulness. This week, I have been working through chapter 3, which is quite fascinating.  In his chapter on “Man-management,” Packer explains how some people can “decry organization as a focus of carnal confidence and an intrinsically Spirit-quenching development.”  The argument is generally made to the effect that “the Spirit of God has to do it” or “the root of the problem is spiritual, not structural.”  Therefore, we need to wait for the Spirit to work upon the hearts of people to move them to action.

The upshot to this thinking is that any kind of practical, structural, or organizational change is superfluous or inconsequential.  Strategy, planning, and developing a system or process are inherently un-spiritual.  It is like inefficiency is godly and spiritual and practical usefulness is suspect.  If I could employ the trisperspectival model to leadership (prophets, priests, and kings), the Reformed tradition, of which I belong, is strongly prophetic and priestly.  However, there is an inhibition or reservation about being strong in the kingly role of leadership–by that I mean administration, planning, developmental processes, etc.

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