Posted tagged ‘Greg Gilbert’

Interview with Kevin DeYoung and Greg Gilbert on the Mission of the Church

October 4, 2011

In the coming weeks, I will be sharing about a new reading initiative out of the PLNTD Network for planters and pastors alike.  Our first reading project will be reading two new and important contributions to the subject of the mission of the church.  The first one is the sequel to Total Church by Steve Timmis and Tim Chester called Everyday Church: Mission by Being Good Neighbours.  The second one is by Kevin DeYoung and Greg Gilbert entitled, What Is the Mission of the Church? Making Sense of Justice, Shalom, and the Great Commission.

IX Marks recently sat down with Kevin DeYoung and Greg Gilbert to discuss their new book, and their interview is broken down in two parts (links are downloadable MP3s).

Part 1 – discussion on the mission of the church, social justice, and the gospel

Part 2 – exegetical considerations on the mission, the poor, and the kingdom of God

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For additional resources, consider:

* Rethinking Missional: Reconciling the Mission of God and the Mission of the Church by Kevin DeYoung


 

 

Disciple-Making and Cultural Transformation

October 27, 2010

Below is a video of Kevin DeYoung, Greg Gilbert, and Ryan Kelly talking about the mission of the church.  DeYoung and Gilbert have a forthcoming book coming out on this subject, and it will certainly be one worth reading.

However, I think Doug Wilson is on to something about seeing things a little differently as it relates to the mission of disciple-making.  Wilson argues:

The commission is not to “make disciples” in our modern individualistic sense. That is included, and amen to it. But the commission as the Lord worded it says that we are to disciple the nations. To say that cultural transformation is not part of this is to completely overlook the direct object of that verb. We are to disciple the ethnoi, their hearts, souls, and minds, but also their court systems, and their film industries, and their politics, and their art studios, and their publishing industries. This certainly means discipling their citizens, and we start with that. But it is just the beginning.

If the point of this video is to start with personal evangelism, then absolutely. If the point is to head off those who want to have a bunch of missional stuff that by-passes gospel declaration, then great. But when we make individual disciples, and we move on to the institutional structures of their cultures and societies, we are not changing the subject. We are not moving on to another area. We are not abandoning the Great Commission. We are just getting started.

What do you think?  Is cultural transformation included in the work of making disciples (which is at the heart of the mission of the church)?

Great Sale on Two New Gospel Resources

March 27, 2010

Hurry, because you only have until April 1st to take advantage of this sweet deal by Westminster Bookstore.  Check it out.  You get two gospel resources for the price of one ($14.49).  Here’s a description of the two books . . .

You Can Change: God’s Transforming Power for our Sinful Behavior and Negative Emotions by Tim Chester

Product Description: A practical, interactive, and solidly biblical book designed to help Christians in all stages of life to find victory over sin by focusing on what God has already done in us.

It’s about heart change, not behavior change. That’s the conviction of Tim Chester as he seeks to help everyday Christians “connect the truth about God with our Monday-morning struggles.” This interactive book, laid out in workbook fashion, is for newer Christians struggling with sin and for more mature Christians who have plateaued in their faith as they seek to find victory over sin in their lives.

With a conviction that sanctification is God’s work and the journey to holiness is joyful, Chester guides readers through a “change project”-beginning with the selection of one area of life they would like to modify. Each chapter includes a question (e.g., Why would you like to change? What truths do you need to turn to?) to guide readers as they deal with a specific sin or struggle, truths from God’s word, and a reflection guide to help readers through their change project.

What is the Gospel? by Greg Gilbert

Product Description: This newest addition to the IX Marks series presents a clear, straightforward statement of the gospel, the third mark of a healthy church.

What Is the Gospel? It seems like a simple question, yet it has been known to incite some heated responses, even in the church. How are we to formulate a clear, biblical understanding of the gospel? Tradition, reason, and experience all leave us ultimately disappointed. If we want answers, we must turn to the Word of God.

Greg Gilbert does so in What Is the Gospel? Beginning with Paul’s systematic presentation of the gospel in Romans and moving through the sermons in Acts, Gilbert argues that the central structure of the gospel consists of four main subjects: God, man, Christ, and a response. The book carefully examines each and then explores the effects the gospel can have in individuals, churches, and the world. Both Christian and non-Christian readers will gain a clearer understanding of the gospel in this valuable resource.